2011 Top Five African Music Producers by Core Wreckah


To mindful music consumers, the role of the producer is as essential and important to the creation of an album as nutrients are to cultivating a healthy lifestyle. One of the wonders of buying albums is getting immersed in the liner notes in order to discover who was responsible for what part on a song. Below is a selection of some producers whom we think are worth checking out.

Becomingphill: His compositions demonstrate an astute musical precision that is sometimes at odds with what is deemed popular. But it is his willingness and ability to participate in genre-mashing experiments that will, in due course, put him miles ahead of his contemporaries. Add to that his sharp ear for well-spaced drums, thumping basslines and a knack for infectious melodies, and you’ve got yourself a musical genius wailing from Namibia’s dusty planes and waiting for just the right moment to crush the
world with his music.

Trompie: this guantlet of Pretoria’s soul is responsible for the lush soundscapes that have made Maliq, Soopastars, and Quietude (to mention a few) forces to reckon with in their respective corners. His productions glide freely over the listener’s ears, leaving flickers of hope and re-enforcing the mantra that good music shall endure irrespective of the time of year. Trompie (or Bleksperm) consistently works towards achieving a sound that is both malleable and pleasing to outsiders and practitioners of hip-hop alike. With work on his EP, “Music about H.E.R”, nearly done, 2012 is likely to see him charting higher frequencies.

Sibot: The reason Sibot’s music ‘works’ is because of his fearless spirit and constant quest to challenge both himself and the crowd by inventing new ways to wreck electronic music. He went quiet for close to two years, perhaps planning his next move after the success of projects such as Playdoe (with Spoek Mathambo) and Real Estate Agents (with Markus Wormstorm). The coming year will see Sibot release a solo EP (soundcloud.com/sibot/ throw-away-promo), something he hasn’t done since his last outing in 2005 with his much-lauded and influential “In with the old”. Sibot is a game-changer, a powerful and necessary presence in the sphere of not only electronic music, but music production in general.

Hipe: From his early days as one half of Ancient Men (with partner D-Mus), to producing for everyone from Imbube to Proverb, to his latter-day incarnation as the man behind Cape Town-based Pioneer Unit’s cultured output, Wayne Lee Robertson surely knows the meaning of ‘paying dues’ and ‘putting in work’. He bleeds hip-hop’s soul, and dishes it out in chunks to
an audience which readily gobbles up his layered productions. Watch out for his work on Cream’s (http://pioneerunit.com/cream/) “Bruinbrood” coming out in 2012 on Pioneer Unit (http://pioneerunit.com/).

Cymtom: Relatively unkown outisde of Lesotho’s confines, Cymtom is steadily stacking enough production credits within the country to ensure that he has a proven track record once he decides to explore the infinite possibilities of global hip-hop. He is a staunch boom-bap adherent, and constantly finds new permutations with which to bless the myriad of artists
from across Lesotho.

To participate pick any category and email your top picks to haveplentymusic@gmail.com
Leave your two cents if you agree or disagree. LEGGO

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2 thoughts on “2011 Top Five African Music Producers by Core Wreckah

  1. […] out South African producer Trompiedoing his sampling beatstrumental thing using one of his favorite hip hop groups Foreign Exchange. […]

  2. […] Pretoria based  rapper/producer Karabo Boyosi @KaraboBoyosi releases a track titled “Kenilworth” from his forthcoming  EP expected for release later in the year. The track features his crew members from The Collective, JanXCynnamon and LaMoola Beatz. Bump if ya like! […]

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